Football


Football

Do Football Kits Matter?

8th November 2020 PERMALINK • 1 min read

Over on the Tifo Football channel on YouTube, Ben Jacobs investigated whether different football kits can have an affect on the game.

It's just a short video, at just over 7 minutes, but he certainly goes into a lot more detail than I imagined. I thought it would just be statistics from the top performing football teams over the years, and then trying to spot a pattern with the kit colours.

He does touch on stats like red being the best performing shirt colour in the Premier League, but that's most likely due to the fact that the three biggest clubs in the UK wear red (Manchester United, Liverpool, and Arsenal). But the section that interested me the most was the goalkeeper shirt colour, and that apparently red is also the best colour in that regard. But in that case it seems to be backed up information, rather than just consequential statistics.

Football

Irish Football Club Announced Player Dead After Returning to Spain

28th November 2018 PERMALINK • 1 min read

A very funny article on OneFootball:

An Irish football club has apologised after falsely reporting a player had died, which prompted the postponement of their own match and a minute’s silence to be held at others.

Ballybrack claimed Fernando Nuno La Fuente had been killed in a road traffic accident and their Leinster Senior League (LSL) clash with Arklow Town on Saturday was suspended as a result.

But it later transpired that the Spanish player was, in fact, still alive and had returned to his homeland.

What an absolute screw up.

Arsenal

It’s the end of football as we know it - just ask Celtic and Arsenal →

14th August 2018 PERMALINK • 1 min read

Roger Mitchell, Chairman of GiveMeSport, and former SPL CEO, writing for GiveMeSport:

Two events this week alluded to Hemingway’s bell.

In reality, these separate incidents, in different ways, suggest the death knell for the end of the amateur and meritocratic soul of European football.

Overly melodramatic for impact? I don’t think so.

Simply, we are witnessing the ruthless elimination, by stealth, of the financial and sporting uncertainty which has been at the core of Association Football, since it was invented in the 1870s, (a mere 100 years after America became a nation.) More from our American cousins later.

There is a case to argue that we are moving, nae, have moved, to the hated franchise commercial model.

Fans weren’t asked. Probably because we would never have agreed. Indeed, fans and their mega clubs are increasingly uncomfortable bedfellows. But the new reality is here, and most of us were asleep at the wheel. Shame on us.

This amateur sport, the most popular game in the world, grew its DNA and developed its soul from British clubs of deep working-class tradition, like Celtic and Arsenal. So, it is neatly appropriate that the clanging chimes of doom this week came from Parkhead and Highbury.

It’s very true that football is becoming more and more commercialised, and I’m not talking about the wages, or transfer fees, but how the clubs are ran nowadays. With all these foreign investors slowly buying the football clubs, they’re turning them into plain businesses. No need to worry about trophies, or about the actual fans, but instead how it can boos their portfolio.

As an Arsenal fan myself, I’m experiencing this quite a lot with the majority shareholder, and soon to be full owner of the club, Stan Kroenke. This will mean no more transparency, no more AGM, no input at all.

Read the full post on GiveMeSport.

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